Last edited by Aranos
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

4 edition of Plains Indian parfleche designs found in the catalog.

Plains Indian parfleche designs

Spier, Leslie

Plains Indian parfleche designs

by Spier, Leslie

  • 298 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by University of Washington Press in Seattle .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indians of North America -- Art,
  • Decoration and ornament

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesParfleche designs.
    Statementby Leslie Spier.
    SeriesUniversity of Washington publications in anthropology -- v. 4, no. 3., Book collection on microfilm relating to the North American Indian -- reel 49.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationp. 295-322
    Number of Pages322
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17741152M
    OCLC/WorldCa8374118

    JOHN MOLLOY GALLERY 49 East 78th St., Suite 2B New York, NY Gallery hours: Tues. - Fri. 11 to 6; Sat. - 11 to 5 [email protected] Featured Ledger Mad Bull Ledger Most recent addition - the Mad Bull Ledger on PILA! The Mad Bull Ledger is now available on the PILA. This important addition to the Plains Indian Ledger digital art collection features fifteen ledger drawings by Southern Arapaho Artist Mad Bull (), including battle scenes, soldiers, ceremonial scenes, and other aspects of warrior societies.

    Parfleche A parfleche is a large envelope of rawhide used by Plains Indians to pack dried food and other things. Rawhide is untanned buffalo skin. When it is wet it can be bent and molded. For many Indians it takes the place of pottery, wood, and bark. You can make a paper parfleche. Materials: Parfleche pattern, scissors, markers, and yarn or cord. The parfleche hide shows paint designs, and that means it was cut from a parfleche envelope. Recycling old parts from other items was common among the plains. Nothing was left to waist when materials were hard to come by. Beaded and Tacked Belt c Indian Tacked Powder Horn ca ’s Showing signs of typical of the Plains.

    The Plains Indians believed in the Great Spirit. The Indians believed the Great Spirit had power over all things including animals, trees, stones, and clouds. The earth was believed to be the mother of all spirits. The sun had great power also because it gave the earth light and warmth. The Plains Indians prayed individually and in groups. North American Indian Design Coloring Book 71 authentic examples of Indian design from Indian masks, beadwork, pottery, metal, stone, and wood selected and redrawn by Paul Kennedy. Sandpainting of gods, battle scenes, geometric designs, birds, flowers, animal figures, more, by Eskimo, Northwest Coast, Pueblo, Navajo, Plains, Chippewa, and other.


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Plains Indian parfleche designs by Spier, Leslie Download PDF EPUB FB2

- Explore medicinehorse7's board "parfleche designs", followed by people on Pinterest. See more ideas about Native american, Native american art, American art pins.

May 3, - Explore lakotabeauchamp's board "Parfleche Bags", followed by people on Pinterest. See more ideas about Native american art, American art and Native american pins.

Plains Indian parfleche designs. [Leslie Spier] Book: All Authors / Contributors: Leslie Spier. Find more information about: Notes: Contains illustrations of the specimens discussed in the author's An analysis of Plains Indians parfleche decoration, published in cf.

Pref. Description: 1 preliminary leaf, pages Make Your Own Parfleche Native Americans from the Columbia Plateau and the Plains stored, transported and shared foods and materials in parfleches.

(“Parfleche” is French, from “parer,” meaning “to deflect,” and “fleche,” meaning “arrow.”) They could be File Size: 55KB. Explain to students that a Plains Indian parfleche was like today’s suitcase.

Engage students in a discussion comparing a parfleche to a suitcase. Refer to Stories and Culture of Plains Indians and Buffalo Supplemental Presentation included in lesson resources. Help students make a t-chart listing the items they carry in their suitcase and File Size: KB.

Plains Indian Parfleche Designs (University of Washington Publications in Anthropology, Vol. 4, No. 3) [Spier, Leslie] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Plains Indian Parfleche Designs (University of Washington Publications in Anthropology, Vol. 4, No. 3)Author: Leslie Spier. Open Library is an open, editable Plains Indian parfleche designs book catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. Plains Indian parfleche designs by Spier, Leslie,University of Washington press edition, in EnglishPages: Parfleche Last updated Ma A parfleche is a type of wallet or bag made from rawhide.

Historically made by Plateau, Great Basin, and Plains women, they are usually decorated with brightly colored geometrical designs. A parfleche is a Native American rawhide container that is embellished by painting, incising, or both.

Contents. Overview; Etymology. Parfleche, tough, folded rawhide carrying bag made by the Plains Indians of North America; more loosely applied, the term also refers to many specialized rawhide Plains Indians had an abundant source of hides in the buffalo they hunted, but, as they were.

The Great Plains Native Americans carried around many items in a parfleche. Students can compare that to a modern-day portfolio or brief case. A Great Plains Native Americans study would look great with these templates, as students can store all of their information within the parfleche by forming pockets on the inside to carry their items.4/5(10).

Antique Sioux (Native American/Plains Indian) Parfleche in a box form constructed of rawhide and intricately painted in an abstract design with hourglass and geometric motifs with. Native American Crafts Plains. Parfleche Background Information A parfleche was used by the Plains Indians to carry their possessions.

It was made from a buffalo hide. The hide was cut into a large rectangular shape. Have students use the markers to color Plains Indian designs on one side of each of the paint stirrers. This book has primitive black and white line drawings of mostly Indians, horses, battles and a few other animals and totems.

It has 3 pages of introduction which is a brief description of North American geographic, flora and fauna, and a paragraph each on the Natives of eight tribes, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Crow, Kiowa, Mandan, Pawnee, and Reviews: 1.

Rawhide parfleche box transported Sioux People's personal belongings as they travelled across Great Plains. Cake pigments embellish case with hourglass and rectangular designs.

Corners are edged with red wool trade cloth. Ex Bud Lake Collection. Size: 15" x 8 1/2" x 7" $ 3, When the plains Indians were moving from place to place, they carried their clothing, valuables, tools, etc.

in a par fleche, which was made from dried buffalo hide and decorated with brightly colored geometric designs. The parfleche was used by the Indian as we would use a suitcase. From the Text: A persistent symbol of Plains Indian culture has been the feathered war bonnet, a stirring, spectacular image reflecting the spirit and pride of these Native Americans and evoking the heroic stance taken by these tribes in the face of European confrontation.

Perhaps a more characteristic symbol would be parfleche, the painted rawhide containers which were integral to their. According to Gaylord Torrence in his seminal catalogue, The American Indian Parfleche() their origin is not definitively known, although they certainly seem to have a relationship with hide painting and designs from Woodland people before they migrated, mounted, toward the Great Plains.

The earliest mention of parfleches by a Euro-American. Once the parfleche left the family, the story was lost and the parfleche became Indian art rather than a meaningful storyteller. In the plateau where the tribes were less mobile, the parfleche was a part of weddings ceremonies, with relatives of the groom giving the couple parfleche containers and relatives of the bride giving cornhusk bags.

Sharp Knife's Blanket Home Page. Plains Indian Reproductions. Pre-orders of my new book. Portraits of Women in the American Fur Trade. are going very well and now we are negotiating with. 26 publishers. Please consider helping me out by pre-ordering the book.

One, parfleche is inseparably associated with the horse. Two, its design bearing distinct woodlands culture characteristics, though parfleche are made typically from bison rawhide, a Plains Indian development.

Reader, you might thing but this could apply to other Plains Indian tribes, and this reader begs your indulgence in finishing this article. A. Typically, any given piece of work would employ three primary beading techniques.

It was a rare piece that used only one technique. 1. (C) Crow-stitch for the main designs and background. 2. (A) Overlay-stitch for the white outlines 3. (B) Lane-stitch (also known as the " lazy-stitch") for borders and central lanes.

4. Zipper-edging stitch, most common found on old beadwork along edges and.The Plains Indians have a well developed decorative art in which simple geometric designs are the elements of composition. This art is primarily the work of women. Clothing and other useful articles, made of skins, were rendered attractive by designs in beads and quills.

Rawhide bags and parfleche were treated with a peculiar type of. Author of Havasupai ethnography, Yuman tribes of the Gila River, Klamath ethnography, Plains Indian parfleche designs, The ghost dance of among the Klamath of Oregon, The prophet dance of the Northwest and its derivatives: the source of the ghost dance, Notes on the Kiowa sun dance, Tribal distribution in Washington.